DACA applicant one of many hoping for immigration reform under Biden administration

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With new policies and legislation in the works, the Biden administration is rolling back former President Donald Trump’s actions against immigration and refugee asylum. Alondra Saldana Castillo dreams to work and settle down with a family of her own in the U.S. She’s applying for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), a program she was recently ineligible for. “I was really nervous about the application process,” Saldana Castillo said. The sixteen-year-old said she’s led a typical American teenage life, but she’s noticed differences between her and her peers.”I always thought that I would be able to get a job just like everybody else and get my driver’s license just like everybody else, but as I got older, I realized I didn’t have that,” said Saldana Castillo.Saldana Castillo immigrated with her mom from Mexico to the United States when she was only one. “This is all I’ve ever known,” said Saldana Castillo.Her mother began working at only 8 years old, never receiving the opportunity for an education. “She didn’t want me to live the life that she lived through,” said Saldana Castillo.In June, the Supreme Court blocked the Trump Administration’s attempt to end DACA, and Alondra’s immigration attorney, Julia Cryne, said a December ruling in a federal court, re-opened the application process, allowing kids like Alondra to be eligible once again. “We’ve been able to help new applicants apply for DACA,” said Cryne.Under the Trump administration, several immigration and refugee programs were rolled back to allow fewer people into the U.S. Policies began to change and policies and requirements tightened. Cryne said an elusive “no blank space” policy on applications was specifically problematic for her clients.”If someone lives in a house, they would leave the “apartment” line blank and they would receive a rejection,” said Cryne.Cryne hopes President Biden’s recent executive orders to end the travel ban and increase the cap to 125,000 refugees allowed to come to the U.S. point to immigration reform.”DACA is a great program, but ultimately it is not a permanent program,” said Cryne. “It only has temporary benefits, and as we’ve seen those benefits can end.” Saldana Castillo now waits to see if her DACA application will be approved.”She’s someone who believes in pursuing her dreams,” said Cryne. “It’s not often easy to do that, and it requires sacrifices in some cases.”

With new policies and legislation in the works, the Biden administration is rolling back former President Donald Trump’s actions against immigration and refugee asylum.

Alondra Saldana Castillo dreams to work and settle down with a family of her own in the U.S. She’s applying for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), a program she was recently ineligible for.

“I was really nervous about the application process,” Saldana Castillo said.

The sixteen-year-old said she’s led a typical American teenage life, but she’s noticed differences between her and her peers.

“I always thought that I would be able to get a job just like everybody else and get my driver’s license just like everybody else, but as I got older, I realized I didn’t have that,” said Saldana Castillo.

Saldana Castillo immigrated with her mom from Mexico to the United States when she was only one.

“This [country] is all I’ve ever known,” said Saldana Castillo.

Her mother began working at only 8 years old, never receiving the opportunity for an education.

“She didn’t want me to live the life that she lived through,” said Saldana Castillo.

In June, the Supreme Court blocked the Trump Administration’s attempt to end DACA, and Alondra’s immigration attorney, Julia Cryne, said a December ruling in a federal court, re-opened the application process, allowing kids like Alondra to be eligible once again.

“We’ve been able to help new applicants apply for DACA,” said Cryne.

Under the Trump administration, several immigration and refugee programs were rolled back to allow fewer people into the U.S. Policies began to change and policies and requirements tightened.

Cryne said an elusive “no blank space” policy on applications was specifically problematic for her clients.

“If someone lives in a house, they would leave the “apartment” line blank and they would receive a rejection,” said Cryne.

Cryne hopes President Biden’s recent executive orders to end the travel ban and increase the cap to 125,000 refugees allowed to come to the U.S. point to immigration reform.

“DACA is a great program, but ultimately it is not a permanent program,” said Cryne. “It only has temporary benefits, and as we’ve seen those benefits can end.”

Saldana Castillo now waits to see if her DACA application will be approved.

“She’s someone who believes in pursuing her dreams,” said Cryne. “It’s not often easy to do that, and it requires sacrifices in some cases.”

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